JULY 2005 NEWS RELEASES 

WEEK OF JULY 28, 2005

WEEK OF JULY 14, 2005

WEEK OF JULY 7, 2005

 

WEEK OF JULY 1, 2005

 

Dock Dogs will make a splash at the Wildlife Expo

The story has simple enough beginnings, but Tulsan Doug Detherow would have never guessed where it would take him.

Detherow met Ken Butler at a Tulsa Hunting Show about five years ago and the two quickly hit it off. And why not, the pair had plenty in common. They both worked at the same company, although in different divisions, they both shared a passion for hunting ducks and geese and they both loved dogs.

At the show Ken entered one of his dogs, a Chesapeake Bay Retriever, in a contest to see whose hunting retriever could jump the farthest into a large tank of water. Ken’s dog took first place and the very next year Doug was at the contest with his very own Chessie competing in the fledgling sport.

Dock Dog competitions, as they are now called, have come a long way since then. Today the sport has swelled to include hundreds of jumping dogs at sanctioned events all across the country, complete with big crowds and big money purses. The competitions are featured in ESPN’s Great Outdoor Games. In fact, Butler and his Chesapeake Bay Retriever won a silver medal at the 2004 Great Outdoor Games.

Today Doug and Ken, who both live in Tulsa, are stars in the world of Dock Dogs, but they’re not getting big heads about the whole thing.

“We often compete against the same teams at several events, but there aren’t many folks who know our first name. But everybody knows our dogs," Doug said.

They couldn’t be happier about that either. They take pride in showing off the breed. Most Dock Dogs are small and fast, like Little Morgan the lightening quick black lab who holds the world record at over 26 feet. On the other hand Chessies are generally big and strong. They jump with power rather than speed. You could compare them to Mac trucks versus little sports cars.

You can see these four-legged athletes at the inaugural Oklahoma Wildlife Expo Aug. 27-28 at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City.

Butler and Detherow will bring several hunting retrievers that are also competition jumpers and they will conduct exhibitions throughout the Expo at a pond inside the Lazy E Arena.

With more than 100 different booths and activities already confirmed, there will be plenty to do during the free, two-day event. Young and old alike will be sure to find something that interests them at the Expo from shotgun shooting, to bird watching, to wild game cooking.

Participants who pre-register for the Expo at wildlifedepartment.com will be eligible for a special lifetime combination license giveaway.

For complete details on Expo giveaways, including rules and eligibility log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

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Boaters needed to take special kids fishing

Camp Cavett is looking for 75 volunteer boat owners to take kids fishing near Catfish Bay on Lake Texoma, Saturday, July 9.

Approximately 150 kids with serious medical conditions from the Oklahoma Children’s Hospital will take part in the Eighth Annual Camp Cavett Kid’s Fishing Derby. The camp offers outdoor experiences to children who are undergoing treatments for illnesses such as heart disease, cancer or sickle cell anemia. People willing to donate their time and boat are in short supply according to personnel with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

“Some of these kids have had a tough time over the last few years, but they’re just like any other kids they love to go fishing and take a boat ride. Both the volunteers and kids have a great time. It is something we all look forward to," said Gene Gilliland, senior fisheries biologist for the Wildlife Department and president of the North Oklahoma City Bassmasters.

A free cookout as well as tackle, bait and lifejackets will be provided.

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New law provides exemptions from Fishing and Hunting Legacy permit

At the close of the 2005 Legislative session, Governor Brad Henry signed several bills that will affect hunters and anglers across the state.

Oklahomans who are normally exempt from an annual hunting or fishing license will no longer be required to purchase a Fishing and Hunting Legacy permit thanks to House Bill 1814. The bill also allows the Department to use revenue from the permit to purchase, lease, or purchase easements for property to be used for public fishing and hunting.

“We were pleased that the Legislature passed this bill to provide some exemptions from the Fishing and Hunting Legacy permit. This is the one bill that was requested by the Wildlife Department and we think this will make the permit more equitable for the hunters and anglers of the state,” said Richard Hatcher, assistant director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

A pair of bills affects Oklahoma residents who were injured while serving their country. House Bill 1240 exempts veterans who are 100 percent disabled from all deer archery, deer primitive firearms and deer gun licenses. Senate Bill 498 creates a $25 lifetime combination license for veterans with a compensable disability of 60 percent or more. It also creates a $200 lifetime combination license for veterans who have a compensable disability up to 60 percent.

Senate Bill 498 also exempts persons fishing in a Department sanctioned aquatic education fishing clinic from fishing license requirements.

Although not a law, House Concurrent Resolution 1010 directs the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission to adopt rules changing the class hour requirement for the traditional hunter education course from ten hours to eight hours.

For more information on these bills or to follow the law-making process next year, log on to wildlifedepartment.com and click on Legislative Tracker. Following is a list of other new legislation signed by the Governor that deals with fish and wildlife issues:

House Bill 1575 - Authorizes residents who are 100 percent disabled and are receiving disability payments from the Multiple Injury Trust Fund to purchase disability hunting and fishing licenses.

House Bill 1814 – In addition to exempting certain persons from the Fishing and Hunting Legacy Permit, it also creates a $5 rattlesnake harvest license for persons who are participating in an organized rattlesnake hunting event or festival. This license allows people in organized rattle snake hunts to participate without also possessing a hunting or combination hunting/fishing license.

House Bill 1722 - Provides that any person who has been convicted or has pleaded guilty to two wildlife violations in a two-year period, may, after one year, apply for a new hunting or fishing license only after paying a reinstatement fee of $200 for residents and $500 for nonresidents. The reinstatement fee shall be in addition to other fees required for the hunting or fishing license.

Senate Bill 685 - Allows residents of the 49 other states, including Kansas, to purchase nonresident deer, antelope or elk licenses regardless of the license policies in those states.

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Wildlife Expo is on target

Where else can you get one-on-one shotgun shooting instruction, try shooting a bow and arrow, squeeze the trigger on a paintball gun or even shoot a pellet gun? The Oklahoma Wildlife Expo, Aug. 27-28 at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City, will offer all these activities and much more.

The Expo will feature eight different booths where participants can take aim at a variety of shooting sports.

"The Expo will offer a great opportunity for individuals to try several different shooting activities. I think the young kids will really enjoy the air rifles and pellet guns and the adults and kids both will like the 3-D archery course and the shotgun shooting," said Bill Dinkines, assistant wildlife chief for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and one of the many Department employees working on the inaugural event. "We’re even going to have two booths where you can use a laser gun in simulated hunting scenarios on a big screen TV."

Instructors with the Wildlife Department’s Shotgun Training and Education Program (STEP) will be on hand giving participants an opportunity to shoot clay targets. Expo attendees will also be able to participate in an interactive Oklahoma – National Archery in the Schools Program demonstration. This new Wildlife Department program helps schools teach students about archery by incorporating it into the physical education curriculum.

Silverleaf Shotgun Sports, just down the road from the Lazy E Arena, will be hosting three youth shotgun safety seminars for kids ages 12-17, Saturday, August 28. Each seminar is limited to 25 students and pre-registration is required. To pre-register call (405) 282-2787.

"One of the best things about all these activities is that they are all free to the public," Dinkines said.

The shooting-related activities certainly will not be the only highlights of the Wildlife Expo. With more than 100 different booths and activities already confirmed, there will be plenty to do during the free, two-day event. Young and old alike will be sure to find something that interests them at the Expo from fishing, to a live butterfly exhibit, to dog training.

Participants who pre-register for the Expo at www.wildlifedepartment.com will be eligible for a special lifetime combination license giveaway. When you pre-register online at www.wildlifedepartment.comand attend the Expo, you will automatically be put in a drawing for a lifetime combination hunting and fishing license.  Funding for these licenses as well as other Expo giveaways was provided by a variety of Expo sponsors. For complete details on this and other Expo giveaways, including rules and eligibility, log on to wildlifedepartment.com

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Konawa Lake number one – seven years running

For the seventh year in a row Konawa Lake ranked number one in the number of bass caught per hour in reservoirs over 1,000 acres according to the 2005 spring electrofishing data recently released by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

Covering 1,300 acres in Seminole County, Konawa produced 151 bass per hour of electrofishing during this year's surveys.

"Konawa has a great reputation as a great bass lake and this survey certainly reflects that. The lake is also well balanced – it ranked third in the number of larger bass (over 14 inches) in the survey," said Kim Erickson, fisheries chief for the Wildlife Department.

Coming in second was Grand Lake, which produced 122 bass per hour during this year's electrofishing bass surveys. Dripping Springs Lake, near Okmulgee, ranked third with 114 bass per hour. Ranking fourth was Tenkiller Lake (112 bass per hour), with Eufaula Lake (95 bass per hour) rounding out the top five.

If you're interested in big bass, the survey is also a great place to determine which lake may hold the highest number of big bass. Biologists keep track of the number of bass over 14 inches recorded for each hour of electrofishing. Tenkiller Lake took first place in the number of bass over 14 inches, and Grand, Konawa and McGee Creek lakes also received high marks.

Large reservoirs certainly are not the only place to catch bass in Oklahoma. The electrofishing data shows that many smaller lakes are home to healthy bass populations. Anglers should remember that high numbers of bass reported in the electrofishing results doesn’t always mean quality size bass are present.

In lakes under 1,000 acres, American Horse Lake, a Wildlife Department lake near Geary, scored tops in the total number of bass per hour with 245 bass per hour.

Coming in second was Cedar Lake, near Wister, which produced 210 bass per hour. The small LeFlore County Lake can also claim the largest bass in the survey, a huge 11.3 pound largemouth.

Taft Lake, near Muskogee, ranked third with 154 bass per hour. Ranking fourth was Garrison Creek Lake (136 bass per hour). This 65-acre Sequoyah County reservoir, owned and operated by the town of Roland, was impounded just three years ago. Existing fishing regulations at Garrison Creek include catch and release bass fishing until March 1, 2006. Dahlgren Lake, located south of Norman on the Lexington Wildlife Management Area, rounded out the top five with 125 bass per hour.

Data from the springtime bass survey is divided between that collected from lakes larger than 1,000 acres, and lakes smaller than 1,000 acres. The data is used to determine the health of individual bass fisheries and how bass populations change over time. Regional fisheries management personnel capture bass using electrofishing equipment, then they weigh and measure each fish before releasing them back into the water unharmed. The information helps biologists determine which lakes benefit from specialized management techniques such as length and slot limits.

Lakes are classified as "Quality" if they can produce good numbers of catchable bass (indicated by at least 40 bass per hour of electrofishing, with at least 10 of those bass 14 inches or longer). "High Quality" lakes produce excellent numbers of catchable bass (at least 60 bass per hour, with 15 or more of those fish 14 inches or longer). Lakes that have trophy potential (capable of producing two fish over 21 inches in length per hour of electrofishing) are rated as "Trophy Quality."

Variations in electrofishing catch rates can result from lake conditions at the time of sampling or from changes in reproduction, recruitment, growth and mortality caused by habitat alteration, environmental impacts, food fish production, disease or angling pressure. All fish collected by biologists through electrofishing are weighed, measured and released unharmed. Not all lakes are surveyed each year.

To view the complete results of the 2005 electrofishing bass results, log onto www.wildlifedepartment.com

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Bollenbach Quail Symposium slated for Aug. 4-5

Landowners, leaseholders and sportsmen interested in bobwhite quail will want to be in Stillwater August 4 and 5 for the fifth annual Bollenbach Quail Symposium to learn about improving habitat from wildlife professionals.

A wide variety of topics surrounding bobwhite quail management will be covered throughout the day, Friday, August 5. Speakers will be presenting information on various aspects of bobwhite ecology and management. Sara Bales, quail habitat biologist with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, will give a special presentation on the Department’s efforts to focus habitat work on certain key areas around the state. Other presentations and panel discussions will cover quail reproduction, habitat management plans, and the effects of habitat work on other species such as predators and songbirds.

The symposium will begin at 8 a.m., Thursday, August 4 at the Best Western Hotel in Stillwater. After a continental breakfast participants will be transported to the Cross Timbers Experimental Range, where they will tour bobwhite habitat management and discuss effective patch burning techniques. A field lunch will be provided.

Registration for the two-day symposium is $25 a day before July 28 and $40 per day after July 28, and covers transportation, meals, refreshments and materials. Those interested can choose to attend either one day or both days. Students 18 and under may attend the symposium free of charge. To register for the symposium or for more information call (405) 744-6489 or log on to http://bollenbachchair.okstate.edu.

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Wildlife Department receives boost from conservation organizations

Thanks to a landmark donation, state sportsmen will soon have more public access to hunt and fish. At its regular monthly meeting held July 11 in Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission accepted a donation of $200,000 from the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation. The gift is believed to be one of the largest ever given to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

According to officials with the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation, the donation was given to the Department to assist in acquiring public lands, primarily for hunting opportunities.

“We have seen an increase in fishing licenses sold, but unfortunately we’ve seen a decrease in the hunting licenses sold,” said Andy McDaniels, executive director of the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation. “We want to assist the Department to provide future generations of hunters with a place to go,” said McDaniels.

Once matched with revenues from the Fishing and Hunting Legacy permit and federal matching grants, the Department anticipates the donation will generate a total of $1.5 million for the purpose of acquiring publicly accessible land.

In other business, the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission learned about a major habitat restoration project being conducted on the Evening Hole portion of the lower Mountain Fork River trout stream. The restoration project is improving not only steam dynamics, water quality and trout habitat, but is also creating highly desirable fishing sites for trout anglers. In a related measure, the Commission accepted a $10,000 donation made by the 89er and Tulsa Chapters of Trout Unlimited to continue habitat work on the Evening Hole project

The Commission also accepted a $5,000 donation presented by Bert Castro, Executive director of the Oklahoma City Zoological Park and Botanical Gardens.

“The Oklahoma City Zoological Parks and Botanical Gardens have been a valuable partner in their commitment to conservation on a local level. In addition to this monetary donation, they are also providing support for the Wildscapes and Butterfly exhibits at the Wildlife Expo,” said Richard Hatcher, assistant director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Zoo’s donation will be used in the Department’s Wildlife Diversity programs.

In other business, the Commission voted to approve a resolution establishing hunting regulations for migratory game birds that open prior to October 1. The resolution establishes the season length for dove, rail, gallinule, woodcock, common snipe, resident Canada Geese and the special September teal season.

“Due to a decline in the results of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s May waterfowl breeding population surveys, this year’s teal season length will run only nine days instead of 16 days, which we had last year,” said Alan Peoples, wildlife chief for the Department. The season lengths for all of the other early migratory species will remain the same as last year, according to Peoples.

For a specific listing of hunting season dates for the species listed above, consult the “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” available at hunting and fishing license vendors in late July.

In other business, the Commission was provided an update of Oklahoma’s Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. Oklahoma, along with 55 other U.S. states and territories are creating a Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy to conserve diversity of wildlife and their habitats. To maintain healthy wildlife population levels, the strategy identifies statewide wildlife issues and necessary conservation actions. The strategy will guide future use of State Wildlife Grant funding beginning with species in the greatest need of conservation.

The Commission also heard an update on conservation education activities at the Department’s Jenks Office. Programs conducted either singly or jointly with the adjacent Oklahoma Aquarium include family fishing clinics, hunter education programs and archery in the schools programs. A report on the training Department personnel receive as part of the Department’s Nuisance Alligator program was also heard by the Commission.

In other action, the Commission recognized a pair of Department employees for their outstanding service to the sportsmen of the state. Employees recognized were: Steve Burge, southeast region information and education specialist, for 20 years of service; and Liz Howard, human resources assistant, for 20 years of service.

The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Wildlife Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate.

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Oklahoma Wildlife Federation donates $200,000 to public hunting and fishing access

The Oklahoma Wildlife Federation has donated $200,000 to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation to be used toward a land acquisition that will provide public access to hunters and anglers in the state. The Federation made the donation, one of the largest in the Wildlife Department’s history, at Monday’s meeting of the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission.

“We are proud to be working once again with the Wildlife Department,” said Andy McDaniels, executive director of the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation. “As part of our commitment to protecting Oklahoma’s wildlife legacy, we hope this donation will provide generations of hunters, anglers and other wildlife enthusiasts a place to carry out our proud outdoor traditions.”

“It's important that we pass on our love of wildlife and the outdoors to the next generation and this is a great opportunity to continue the good work presently being done to provide hunting and fishing opportunities for youth," said Bill Phelps, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Commission Chairman.

Wildlife Department officials are developing guidelines to determine which property will be purchased with the money. A wide variety of variables are being considered, such as hunting and fishing opportunities and proximity to other wildlife management areas.

“We greatly appreciate this donation from the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation and are confident that this will benefit Oklahoma’s hunters and anglers for years to come,” said Greg Duffy, director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

The Wildlife Department will match the contribution with funds from the Fishing and Hunting Legacy permit and federal matching grants to reach a goal of $1.5 million. The funds will be used to purchase property for public hunting and fishing in the state.

Since 1951, the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation has worked to provide a unified voice for the sportsmen and women of the state. The Federation is involved in teaching hunter education classes, improving wildlife habitat and informing state and federal lawmakers about the importance of wildlife-related legislation.

For more information on the Oklahoma Wildlife Federation log on to okwildlife.org or call (405) 308-5490.

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Cutline: The Oklahoma Wildlife Federation donated $200,000 to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation to be used toward a land acquisition that will provide public access to hunters and anglers in the state. From left to right Richard Hatcher, assistant director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, Andy McDaniels, Executive Director of Oklahoma Wildlife Federation, John Naeher, board president for Oklahoma Wildlife Federation, Greg Duffy, director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

 

 

Wildlife Expo activities to include one-of-a-kind hunter education course

A unique hunter education class will be offered for aspiring hunters, Saturday, August 27 at the Wildlife Expo at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City.

“With hunting seasons right around the corner, this is a great chance to complete the hunter education course,” said Lance Meek, hunter education coordinator for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “We’re excited about it, because this is the first course of its kind and you won’t find a more flexible hunter ed class. And don’t forget, both the Expo and the hunter ed course are free to the public.”

Traditionally, hunter ed classes are centered on classroom instructions, this special class will be a hands-on and interactive experience. Simply register for the class and complete the hunter education home study course through the booklets or online course. Then check in at the Expo, and visit various learning stations around the Expo grounds. Stations will include archery, rifle shooting, tree stand safety and more.

Take all the time you want to visit each station and then come back to the hunter ed headquarters to take the test. Hunter education instructors will grade your test and, should you pass, give you your card right on the spot.

As an added bonus, one lucky Expo hunter education participant will win a lifetime hunting license thanks to the generosity of Expo sponsors. For complete details on this and other Expo giveaways, including rules and eligibility, log on to wildlifedepartment.com

To sign up for this unique course call (405) 521-4636 and be prepared to provide your name, address, date of birth and social security number. Before you come to the Wildlife Expo, be sure to complete the online home study course at wildlifedepartment.com. You can also pick up home study booklets at Wildlife Department offices in Oklahoma City, Jenks, or Higgins. Booklets are also available at the Midwest City Library and the H&H Gun Range in Oklahoma City.

The hunter ed activities certainly will not be the only highlights of the Wildlife Expo. With more than 100 different booths and activities already confirmed, there will be plenty to do during the free, two-day event, which will be held August 27 and 28 at the Lazy E Arena. Young and old alike will be sure to find something that interests them at the Expo from shotgun shooting, to a live butterfly exhibit, to dog training

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Controlled hunt results available online July 21

Applicants can find out if they were drawn for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's Controlled Hunt program beginning July 21 by logging onto www.wildlifedepartment.com.

The opportunity to harvest an animal from some of the best managed lands for wildlife have made the controlled hunts one of the most popular programs the Department offers. Applicants anxious to know if they were drawn can access the Controlled Hunt drawing results through the Department's Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com. Click on the "Controlled Hunts Results" banner and enter your last name, birthday, and the number the hunter used on the original application; either their social security or driver’s license number. The system will only access the Controlled Hunts results database when the correct number (SSN, or, D.L.) matches with the hunter’s other information. This service is free, easy and instantaneous and has been very popular the last six years.

Sportsmen have found that checking the results from the comfort of their home or office is very easy and is often the most efficient way to find out if you have been selected. Sportsmen without readily available Internet access can check their results at computer terminals available at the Department's headquarters and regional offices during regular business hours. In addition, many local libraries offer Internet access to library cardholders. Check with your local library for Internet services and user-policies. Successful applicants will also be notified by mail.

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Outdoor Channel to host auditions at Wildlife Expo

Have you ever dreamed of hosting your own fishing show? You just might get that chance if you participate in a special event at the Oklahoma Wildlife Expo, Aug. 27 & 28 at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City.

The Outdoor Channel will be hosting auditions on Saturday, Aug. 27 in search of fishing show hosts. If you think you have what it takes then stop by their trailer, step in front of the camera and tell them why you deserve your own show.

Auditions will be taking place throughout the year at various venues across the country. A semi-finalist will be chosen from each audition site. The semi-finalists will be featured on the Outdoor Channel Web site later this year. Five finalists will be selected from the semi-finalists.

They will be featured on the Web site during January 2006 so the public can vote for their favorite entry. The finalist with the most votes wins, and the winner will be announced in February of 2006. That lucky person will film their show sometime next summer and see it on The Outdoor Channel.

While at the Expo stop by and visit with TV personalities Cody and Cody from On the Water and In the Woods and Outdoor Oklahoma's host Todd Craighead. Cody and Cody will be at the Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. both days within the Oklahoma State Parks and Tourism booth. Craighead will be making announcements in the arena and will be at the Wildlife Department's booth.

If a fishing show is not your thing, there are still lots of other activities going on at the Wildlife Expo. With more than 100 different booths and activities already confirmed, there will be plenty to do during the free, two-day event, Aug. 27 and 28 at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City between Edmond and Guthrie.

Pre-registration for the Expo isn't required, but those who do will be eligible for a special lifetime combination license giveaway. To register online, go to www.wildlifedepartment.com. Funding for these licenses as well as other Expo giveaways was provided by a variety of Expo sponsors. For complete details on this and other Expo giveaways, including rules and eligibility, log on to wildlifedepartment.com

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Norman hunter education clinic deadline days away

One of the nation's largest hunter education clinics is just a few weeks away. The 34th annual Norman hunter education clinic will be held Saturday, August 13, but the deadline for registering is August 1.

"It's always a fun time and we think this year's clinic will be better than ever. We will again use the home study format, which allows the students to come ready to learn and complete the course in half the time," said Lance Meek, hunter education coordinator for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

Students must register for the course by calling (405) 521-4636 and then complete a home study hunter education workbook or the Internet course, which they will bring to class. In the past, students were allowed to "walk-in" on the day of the course. That will not be an option this year, as they must pre-register and complete the workbook.

Students will have the opportunity to fire a .22 rifle and participate in field exercises including fence crossing and firearms field carries.

"We don't want anyone to miss out on this class. That is why it is so important to get registered and complete the workbook," Meek said.

Currently, workbooks are available at the following locations:

Wildlife Department Headquarters, 1801 N. Lincoln, Oklahoma City.

H & H Gun Range, 400 South Vermont, Suite 110 (I-40 and MacArthur ), Oklahoma City.

Midwest City Library, 8143 East Reno Avenue (N. Midwest Blvd. and E. Reno Ave.), Midwest City,

R&S Gun Services and Supply, 111 N. Broadway, Moore

Mercury Sign and Banner, 121 24th Ave. (24th & Main), Norman

The Internet version of the course can be found at www.wildlifedepartment.com

 

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Wildlife Expo calling for youth coyote callers

A youth coyote calling contest will take place at the Oklahoma Wildlife Expo Saturday, August 27, at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City.

The contest, sponsored by the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predator Callers Association, will be divided into two age classes, 12 and under and 13-17 year olds. The contest starts at 1 p.m. at the outdoor stage. Contestants will be judged on coyote barks, coyote bark howls and a coyote distress sound. Prizes will be awarded immediately following the contest. For more information or to register for the contest contact Scott Ruff at (918) 456-0520 or email at scottruff65@yahoo.com or visit the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predator Callers Association at the Expo Saturday before noon.

In addition to listening to the youth callers, Expo visitors will have the opportunity to learn the history of trapping and its role in modern conservation. Hear from experts with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services, the Oklahoma Fur Harvesters Association and the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predator Callers Association. Hands-on demonstrations and programs relating to trapping, predator calling and fur use will be given throughout the Expo. Traps, furs and skulls will also be on display.

The youth calling contest is just one of the many highlights of the Wildlife Expo hosted by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. With more than 100 different booths and activities already confirmed, there will be plenty to do during the free, two-day event, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, August 27 and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, August 28. The Lazy E Arena is located east of I-35 between Edmond and Guthrie.

Participants who pre-register for the Expo at wildlifedepartment.com will be eligible for a special lifetime combination license giveaway. To register online, go to wildlifedepartment.com. Funding for these licenses, as well as other Expo giveaways, was provided by a variety of Expo sponsors. For complete details on this and other Expo giveaways, including rules and eligibility, log on to wildlifedepartment.com

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Department to hold vehicle auction

Are you in the market for a used vehicle? If so, you will want to attend the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's upcoming public vehicle auction. It will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, August 18, at the Wildlife Department's headquarters located at 1801 N. Lincoln in Oklahoma City.

"We have a good variety of Ford and Chevrolet trucks. All of them are four-wheel drive and many of them are extended cab models," said Johnny Hill, property manager for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. "We're going to sell everything as is to the highest bidder."

A total of 24 vehicles will be available at the event, including a 1997 Chevy Blazer, a 1998 1/2 ton Ford truck and a 1994 1-ton Chevy truck.

The sale will start promptly at 6:00 p.m. and items may be inspected August 18 from 10 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. For more information about the auction call (405) 521-4600 or for a complete list of auction vehicles, log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

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